Research Firm Takes Full Floor at RXR’s 1330 Avenue of the Americas

1330 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS. PHOTO: COSTAR GROUP

1330 AVENUE OF THE AMERICAS. PHOTO: COSTAR GROUP

Economic research firm Cornerstone Macro is relocating its offices within Midtown after agreeing to take 16,300 square feet at RXR Realty’s 1330 Avenue of the Americas, Commercial Observer has learned.

The company agreed late last week to a 10-year lease for the entire fifth floor at the 40-story, roughly 526,000-square-foot office building between West 53rd and West 54th Streets, according to sources with knowledge of the transaction. Cornerstone Macro is expected to move from its current location at nearby 650 Fifth Avenue, where it occupies nearly 11,000 square feet, in the summer of 2018.

Asking rent in the deal was in the high $70s per square foot, sources said. The tenant was represented in the transaction by Garett Varricchio and Jessica Tenenbaum of MHP Real Estate Services, while RXR’s Alexandra Budd represented the landlord in-house alongside Cushman & Wakefield’s Peter Trivelas.

“Cornerstone Macro wanted to align themselves with an excellent and reputable landlord, and they were able to achieve that through this transaction with RXR,” Varricchio told CO.

The same cannot be said for the reputation of Cornerstone Macro’s current landlord at 650 Fifth Avenue, the Alavi Foundation, which is notorious for its connections with the Iranian government. In June, a federal district court jury ruled that the U.S. government could seize the 36-story office tower after it was determined that the nonprofit foundation, which owns a 60 percent stake in the property, violated U.S. sanctions against Iran via its partnership with Assa Corp. Assa functioned as a front for an Iranian state-controlled bank that owned the remaining 40 percent of 650 Fifth Avenue, until a federal judge ruled in 2013 that the government could seize Assa’s share.

But Varricchio said that Cornerstone Macro’s move to 1330 Avenue of the Americas was more motivated by the tenant’s desire to stay in Midtown—as well as the “boutique nature of the building,” given its relatively smaller floor plates compared to most of the surrounding Class A office stock.

Law firm CKR Law recently doubled its footprint at 1330 Avenue of the Americasafter inking a lease for the entire 16,300-square-foot 12th floor, as CO first reported last week. That deal took CKR Law’s total square footage at the property to nearly 33,000 square feet.

An RXR spokeswoman confirmed the deal but declined further comment. Representatives for Cushman & Wakefield did not immediately provide comment.

https://commercialobserver.com/2017/11/research-firm-cornerstone-macro-nyc-office-rxr-realty-1330-avenue-of-the-americas/

BY REY MASHAYEKHI NOVEMBER 9, 2017 12:40 PM

Stat of the Week: $20.16 Per Square Foot

As the “unofficial” start to the summer season approaches, what better way to celebrate Memorial Day weekend than by heading outdoors for some fun in the sun? Since it’s not quite warm enough to head to the beach, let’s stroll through some of Manhattan’s most famous parks and enjoy the cool breeze and greenery. Everyone knows office buildings with views of the 843-acre Central Park command a premium compared to the rest of the office leasing market. Analyzing the office buildings around three other parks within Midtown and Midtown South uncover similar results, as the average asking rent of $92.16 per square foot for buildings surrounding Union Square, Madison Square and Bryant Park are $20.16 per square foot higher than the Manhattan average.

The first park on the list is Union Square Park, which is bordered by 10 office buildings totaling more than 978,000 square feet. Currently there is more than 79,000 square feet of vacant office space in this park set, for a vacancy rate of 8.1 percent. Despite a vacancy rate higher than Midtown South’s 6.1 percent vacancy, at $74.94 per square foot, asking rents in these buildings are $5.01 higher than the Midtown South average.

The second park examined is Madison Square Park, which is surrounded by 12 buildings totaling more than 6.9 million square feet. This park set is extremely tight with only 169,115 square feet of vacant space—a 2.4 percent vacancy rate—370 basis points lower than Midtown South. Asking rents in these buildings are averaging $77.86 per square foot, a $7.93 premium over the Midtown South average of $69.93 per square foot.

The last park analyzed, Bryant Park, resides within Midtown, and this park set contains 20 buildings totaling more than 9.6 million square feet. Despite having the highest vacancy of the three park sets, at 9.3 percent it is still 10 basis points lower than Midtown’s 9.4 percent vacancy. In the Bryant Park set, asking rents are $101.91 per square foot and command a $23.12 premium over the $78.79 per square foot Midtown average.

So, as you stroll through Manhattan’s parks this season, keep in mind that even though money doesn’t grow on trees, you need quite a bit to look at them from your office window.

https://commercialobserver.com/2016/05/stat-of-the-week-20-16-per-square-foot/

Stat of the Week: $38.08 Per Square Foot

At $83.54 per square foot, Midtown Class A overall average asking rents are 2.3 percent higher than three months ago. This average asking rent includes 40 buildings that stand out above the rest, and these trophy assets have the highest asking rents in Midtown. Through the first quarter, the Midtown trophy set averaged $121.62 per square foot, a $38.08 premium over the Midtown Class A average. Trophy asking rents jumped 6.2 percent higher and outpaced Midtown Class A gains of only 3.2 percent in the past year. The first quarter also marked the largest spread between trophy asking rents and Midtown Class A asking rents in the last 30 quarters (or seven and a half years). Midtown Class A asking rents are still 9.8 percent lower than the previous historical highs in 2008, while trophy asking rents are only 6.9 percent off of the mark.

Trophy net effective rents are significantly higher than Midtown Class A as well. Through the first quarter of 2016, net effective rents for trophy assets averaged $107.13 per square foot, a $41.64 premium over the Midtown Class A average. This premium is 95.1 percent higher than the historical $21.34 per square foot average spread between the trophy set and Midtown Class A net effective rents.

Higher asking rents are not the only reason a building is in the Midtown trophy set. Demand for these buildings is high as well, as the current vacancy rate of 8.6 percent is 110 basis points lower than the Midtown Class A vacancy rate of 9.7 percent. Over the past five quarters, trophy assets had an average vacancy rate of 7.9 percent, which actually jumped in the first quarter due to 307,884 square feet added to the market at 65 East 55th Street. During this time, vacancy in the trophy set averaged 170 basis points lower than Midtown Class A. With all of these significant differences, it’s clear that trophy assets are certainly the winning prize, towering over Class A Midtown space in every aspect.

https://commercialobserver.com/2016/05/stat-of-the-week-38-08-per-square-foot/